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Trends in invasive alien species vertebrate eradications

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Last update

2016

Coverage

Global

Availability

Not freely available

Partners

Issg logo

IUCN Invasive Species Specalist Group

Island conservation

Island Conservation

Contact point

Indicator description

Invasive alien species (IAS) are plants, animals or micro-organisms outside of their natural geographic range whose introduction and or spread threatens biodiversity, food security, human health, trade, transport and or economic development. They pose the second biggest threat to biodiversity globally, and in certain ecosystems notably islands, the greatest threat to biodiversity. IAS have reached all corners of the globe and impact biodiversity in many ways. The cost of damage caused by invasive species is estimated as US$ 1.4 trillion per annum – close to 5% of global GDP. Invasive species indicators and alien species trends allow assessment of the efficacy of biosecurity policies. Trends in policy responses, legislation and management plans to control and prevent spread of invasive alien species demonstrates the commitment of nations and institutions to addressing this threat.

Related Aichi Targets

Primary target

9

Target 9:

By 2020, invasive alien species and pathways are identified and prioritized, priority species are controlled or eradicated, and measures are in place to manage pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment.

Secondary targets

Target 5:

By 2020, the rate of loss of all natural habitats, including forests, is at least halved and where feasible brought close to zero, and degradation and fragmentation is significantly reduced.

Target 10:

By 2015, the multiple anthropogenic pressures on coral reefs, and other vulnerable ecosystems impacted by climate change or ocean acidification are minimized, so as to maintain their integrity and functioning.

Target 11:

By 2020, at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water, and 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, especially areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services, are conserved through effectively and equitably managed, ecologically representative and well connected systems of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures, and integrated into the wider landscapes and seascapes.

Target 12:

By 2020 the extinction of known threatened species has been prevented and their conservation status, particularly of those most in decline, has been improved and sustained.

Target 17:

By 2015 each Party has developed, adopted as a policy instrument, and has commenced implementing an effective, participatory and updated national biodiversity strategy and action plan.

Primary target

9

Target 9:

By 2020, invasive alien species and pathways are identified and prioritized, priority species are controlled or eradicated, and measures are in place to manage pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment.

5
10
12
11
17
9

Related SDGs

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GOAL 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.

Target 15.8| Relevant indicator

By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species.

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 15

GOAL 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 15

Other related MEAs and processes

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IPBES Global Assessment Chapters

Chapter 2| Official indicator

Status and trends; indirect and direct drivers of change

Chapter 3| Official indicator

Progress towards meeting major international objectives related to biodiversity and ecosystem services

Chapter 6| Official indicator

Opportunities and challenges for decision makers

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IPBES Regional Assessment Chapters

Chapter 4| Official indicator

Direct and indirect drivers of change in the context of different perspectives of quality of life

Chapter 6| Official indicator

Options for governance, institutional arrangements and private and public decision-making across scales and sectors

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IPBES Global Assessment Chapters

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IPBES Regional Assessment Chapters

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Themes

Bip policy

Policy & conservation actions

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Bip policy
Bip species

Partners

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Island conservation

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Last update

2016

Coverage

Global

Availability

Not freely available

Indicator description

Invasive alien species (IAS) are plants, animals or micro-organisms outside of their natural geographic range whose introduction and or spread threatens biodiversity, food security, human health, trade, transport and or economic development. They pose the second biggest threat to biodiversity globally, and in certain ecosystems notably islands, the greatest threat to biodiversity. IAS have reached all corners of the globe and impact biodiversity in many ways. The cost of damage caused by invasive species is estimated as US$ 1.4 trillion per annum – close to 5% of global GDP. Invasive species indicators and alien species trends allow assessment of the efficacy of biosecurity policies. Trends in policy responses, legislation and management plans to control and prevent spread of invasive alien species demonstrates the commitment of nations and institutions to addressing this threat.

Contact point

Graphs / Diagrams

Figure 1. Cumulative eradication attempts and the cumulative numbers of successful eradications over time. Cumulative number of countries and territories attempting eradications, Countries and territories are counted in the first year they attempted an eradication.

Current storyline

Invasive species on islands are a key threatening process that has led to extinctions and endangerment of insular flora and fauna (Tershy et al. 2015, Doherty et al. 2016). Invasive mammals including rodents, feral cats and ungulates are known to be widespread, and represent highly damaging species when introduced to islands (Towns et al. 2006, Medina et al. 2011). Removing invasive mammals from islands is an increasingly common conservation strategy to protect biodiversity amongst countries with islands and island countries (Veitch and Clout 2002, Veitch et al. 2011), with significant conservation gains recorded (Jones et al. 2016).

The Database of Island Invasive Species Eradications compiles all of the historical and current invasive vertebrate eradications on islands. Data from each project includes information on the island, methods used in the eradication and contact information for people knowledgeable about the eradication.

Of 1,184 attempts to remove invasive vertebrates from islands, 1028 were classified as successful or failed (excluding reinvasions) with and 87% success rate. More than 30 countries and territories have attempted eradications.

Data and methodology

Coverage: Islands time series (1870-2016).

Possible disaggregations: Global.

Metadata used: Data is from the Database of Islands and Invasive Species Eradications, downloaded November 2016. Data includes both alien mammals and birds. An attempt to remove one invasive animal population from one island is considered one eradication in this dataset. Data was restricted to events including feral animals, whole island eradications (thus excluding restricted range events or incursions), data quality as good or satisfactory, and scored as either failed, successful or successful but reinvaded. Note failed reflects operational failure, whereas successful but reinvaded reflects a successful operation but the invasive population subsequently recolonized. Successful but reinvaded may be sometimes represent misclassified failures, thus we excluded them from determining the rate of success. End date typically reflects the year the operation was reported as complete, and not necessarily the year the eradication was confirmed as successful or failed.

Eradication and removal of invasive vertebrate pests from Island countries protects biodiversity and prevents extinctions of threatened native and endemic species.

Data from the Database of Islands and Invasive Species Eradications http://diise.islandconservation.org/, developed by Island Conservation, Coastal Conservation Action Laboratory University of California at Santa Cruz, IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group, University of Auckland and Landcare Research New Zealand was used in the development of this indicator.

While every effort is made to maintain the data please note that errors or omissions may still occur. Please read the disclaimer at http://diise.islandconservation.org/.

National use of indicator

Further resources

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Last update

2016

Coverage

Global

Availability

Not freely available

Partners

Issg logo

IUCN Invasive Species Specalist Group

Island conservation

Island Conservation

Contact point