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Red List Index (wild relatives of domesticated animals)

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

State

Applicable for national use

Yes (find out more)

Indicator classification

Operational and included in the CBD's list of indicators

Indicator type

State

Applicable for national use

Yes (find out more)

Indicator classification

Operational and included in the CBD's list of indicators

Last update

2018

Coverage

Global

Availability

Data freely available

Partners

Nslogocolortagtrans

NatureServe

Kew logo 2015 k

Kew Gardens

Iucn logo en

IUCN

Zsl logo stacked cmyk

Zoological Society of London

Birdlife aug2013

BirdLife International

Indicator description

Wild species that are close relatives of species used for food may contain genetic diversity that can be utilised to maintain food security in future under global change. There are few data on genetic diversity and trends in this for wild relatives of domesticated species. There is, however, a relationship between genetic diversity and extinction risk. Given that it is not currently practical to measure trends in genetic diversity of wild species at a global or regional scale, it is reasonable to use the Red List Index (RLI) as a surrogate for trends in genetic diversity. This version of the RLI is based only on data for birds and mammals that are close relatives of domesticated species, and shows changes in their aggregate extinction risk over time. Declines in the index indicate that we may be losing genetic diversity that is important for maintaining food security.

Related Aichi Targets

Primary target

13

Target 13:

By 2020, the genetic diversity of cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and of wild relatives, including other socio-economically as well as culturally valuable species, is maintained, and strategies have been developed and implemented for minimizing genetic erosion and safeguarding their genetic diversity.

Primary target

13

Target 13:

By 2020, the genetic diversity of cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and of wild relatives, including other socio-economically as well as culturally valuable species, is maintained, and strategies have been developed and implemented for minimizing genetic erosion and safeguarding their genetic diversity.

13

Related SDGs

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 02

GOAL 2 - End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

Target 2.5| Relevant indicator

By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and ensure access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed.

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 02

GOAL 2 - End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 02

Partners

Nslogocolortagtrans
Kew logo 2015 k
Iucn logo en
Zsl logo stacked cmyk
Birdlife aug2013

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

State

Applicable for national use

Yes (find out more)

Indicator classification

Operational and included in the CBD's list of indicators

Indicator type

State

Applicable for national use

Yes (find out more)

Indicator classification

Operational and included in the CBD's list of indicators

Last update

2018

Coverage

Global

Availability

Data freely available

Indicator description

Wild species that are close relatives of species used for food may contain genetic diversity that can be utilised to maintain food security in future under global change. There are few data on genetic diversity and trends in this for wild relatives of domesticated species. There is, however, a relationship between genetic diversity and extinction risk. Given that it is not currently practical to measure trends in genetic diversity of wild species at a global or regional scale, it is reasonable to use the Red List Index (RLI) as a surrogate for trends in genetic diversity. This version of the RLI is based only on data for birds and mammals that are close relatives of domesticated species, and shows changes in their aggregate extinction risk over time. Declines in the index indicate that we may be losing genetic diversity that is important for maintaining food security.

Graphs / Diagrams

Red List

Red List Indices for wild relatives of domesticated mammal and bird species, and an aggregated index based on results for both groups. Confidence intervals are shown in grey (these are so narrow as to be barely visible for the RLI for wild relatives of domesticated bird species). Source: McGowan et al, 2018.

Current storyline

The Red List Index (RLI) shows changes in the aggregate extinction risk of sets of species over time. It is an index of the rate at which species move through categories on the IUCN Red List towards or away from extinction. The Red List Index can be disaggregated to show trends in survival probability for subsets of species that are known to be wild relatives of domesticated animal species. It is based on data from the IUCN Red List – the number of species in each Red List category of extinction risk, and the number moving categories between assessments owing to genuine improvement or deterioration in status.

Red List Index value of 1.0 equates to all species being categorized as Least Concern, and hence that none are expected to go extinct in the near future. A Red List Index value of zero indicates that all species have gone extinct. A downwards trend in the graph line (i.e. decreasing Red List Index values) means that the expected rate of species extinctions is increasing i.e. that the rate of biodiversity loss is increasing. Aichi Target 13 and SDG 2.5 calls for the genetic diversity of the wild relatives of farmed and domesticated animals to be maintained. The decline in this Red List Index indicates that this genetic diversity is currently being lost.

The indicator is developed by IUCN and BirdLife International.

Underlying data come from the IUCN Red List, which is developed by IUCN and the Red List Partnership (Arizona State University, BirdLife International, Botanic Gardens Conservation International, Conservation International, NatureServe, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Sapienza University of Rome, Texas A&M University, and The Zoological Society of London).

Logos shown are those for Red List Partners who are also BIP partners.

Data and methodology

Coverage:

Global time series (1988 for birds, 1996 for mammals. Aggregate index from 1988)
Regional/National time series (can be calculated using national or regional data)

Global baseline (Birds and mammals been comprehensively assessed)

Regional/National baseline (National RLIs based on assessments of extinction risk are available for a number of taxa and countries – see http://www.iucnredlist.org/about/publication/red-list-index, while many other countries have completed national red lists but not yet repeated these to produce an RLI: see www.nationalredlist.org. Such national RLIs could be disaggregated to produce national RLIs for wild relatives of domesticated species.

Scale: Aggregated from species level data which may be collected nationally, regionally and/or globally.

Time series available: 1980 –2016.

Next planned update: Updates are released periodically. The next will be 2019 for mammals and 2020 for birds.

Possible disaggregations: This indicator is a disaggregation of the Red List Index.

Methodology: The RLI is well-established as a biodiversity indicator. This version has been recently developed and published in Mc Gowan et al 2018.

National use of indicator

This version of the RLI is based only on data for birds and mammals that are wild relatives of domesticated species. As this represents a more restricted subset of the global RLI dataset, in many countries there may be insufficient data for a meaningful index to be disaggregated at the national scale. In such cases it is better to calculate the index based on repeated assessments of national extinction risk based on national Red Lists, if these are available.

Those interested in producing this indicator at the national or regional level can email Stuart Butchart (Stuart.butchart@birdlife.org).

Further resources

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

State

Applicable for national use

Yes (find out more)

Indicator classification

Operational and included in the CBD's list of indicators

Indicator type

State

Applicable for national use

Yes (find out more)

Indicator classification

Operational and included in the CBD's list of indicators

Last update

2018

Coverage

Global

Availability

Data freely available

Partners

Nslogocolortagtrans

NatureServe

Kew logo 2015 k

Kew Gardens

Iucn logo en

IUCN

Zsl logo stacked cmyk

Zoological Society of London

Birdlife aug2013

BirdLife International