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Proportion of countries adopting relevant national legislation and adequately resourcing the prevention or control of invasive alien species

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Last update

2010

Coverage

Global

Availability

Not freely available

Partners

Issg logo

IUCN Invasive Species Specalist Group

Conu logo cmyk

Concordia University

Contact point

Indicator description

This indicator measures the adoption of national legislation relevant to the prevention or control of invasive alien species. The global trend in policy response has been positive for the few last decades and, since the publication of GBO3, the adoption of policies against invasive alien species have significantly increased.

Related Aichi Targets

Primary target

9

Target 9:

By 2020, invasive alien species and pathways are identified and prioritized, priority species are controlled or eradicated, and measures are in place to manage pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment.

Secondary targets

Target 5:

By 2020, the rate of loss of all natural habitats, including forests, is at least halved and where feasible brought close to zero, and degradation and fragmentation is significantly reduced.

Target 10:

By 2015, the multiple anthropogenic pressures on coral reefs, and other vulnerable ecosystems impacted by climate change or ocean acidification are minimized, so as to maintain their integrity and functioning.

Target 11:

By 2020, at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water, and 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, especially areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services, are conserved through effectively and equitably managed, ecologically representative and well connected systems of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures, and integrated into the wider landscapes and seascapes.

Target 12:

By 2020 the extinction of known threatened species has been prevented and their conservation status, particularly of those most in decline, has been improved and sustained.

Target 17:

By 2015 each Party has developed, adopted as a policy instrument, and has commenced implementing an effective, participatory and updated national biodiversity strategy and action plan.

Primary target

9

Target 9:

By 2020, invasive alien species and pathways are identified and prioritized, priority species are controlled or eradicated, and measures are in place to manage pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment.

5
10
12
11
17
9

Related SDGs

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 15

GOAL 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.

Target 15.8| Relevant indicator

By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species.

Target 15.8| Official indicator

By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species.

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 15

GOAL 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.

E sdg goals icons individual rgb 15

Other related MEAs and processes

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IPBES Global Assessment Chapters

Chapter 6| Relevant indicator

Opportunities and challenges for decision makers

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IPBES Regional Assessment Chapters

Chapter 6| Relevant indicator

Options for governance, institutional arrangements and private and public decision-making across scales and sectors

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IPBES Global Assessment Chapters

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IPBES Regional Assessment Chapters

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Themes

Bip policy

Policy & conservation actions

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Bip policy
Bip species

Partners

Issg logo
Conu logo cmyk

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Last update

2010

Coverage

Global

Availability

Not freely available

Indicator description

This indicator measures the adoption of national legislation relevant to the prevention or control of invasive alien species. The global trend in policy response has been positive for the few last decades and, since the publication of GBO3, the adoption of policies against invasive alien species have significantly increased.

Contact point

Graphs / Diagrams

Figure 1. Adoption of national legislation relevant to the prevention or control of invasive alien species. Source: McGeoch et al. (2010) Global indicators of alien species invasion: threats, biodiversity impacts and responses. Diversity and Distributions, 16, 95-108.

Current storyline

Invasive alien species (IAS) are plants, animals or micro-organisms outside of their natural geographic range whose introduction and or spread threatens biodiversity, food security, human health, trade, transport and or economic development. They pose the second biggest threat to biodiversity globally, and in certain ecosystems notably islands, the greatest threat to biodiversity. IAS have reached all corners of the globe and impact biodiversity in many ways. The cost of damage caused by invasive species is estimated as US$ 1.4 trillion per annum – close to 5% of global GDP.

This indicator measures the adoption of national legislation relevant to the prevention or control of invasive alien species. The global trend in policy response has been positive for the few last decades and, since the publication of GBO3, the adoption of policies against invasive alien species have significantly increased.

As reported in 2010, 55% of the countries signatories to the CBD have enacted invasive alien species relevant national legislation, and most CBD parties were signatory to at least one of ten other multilateral agreements that cover IAS in some form. Among these countries 8% are signatory to all 10 international agreements (McGeoch et al. 2010). For example, the Council of Europe has been developing and adopting codes of conduct addressing some key pathways (e.g. horticulture, botanic gardens, zoos, hunting, or fishing) of invasive alien species. Moreover, once the European regulation on invasive alien species is fully adopted, it will have major implications for neighbouring countries, but also at a world scale, as the European institution is a major partner for global trade.

Data and methodology

Coverage:

Global: RLI 1988-2008, international policy: 1950-2009, national policy: 1965-2009.

Regional/national: Europe time series 1900-2010, several European national time series.

Possible disaggregations: Regional, national and by taxonomic group (e.g. migratory or traded species).

National use of indicator

Further resources

Key indicator facts

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Indicator type

Response

Applicable for national use

No

Indicator classification

Potential for future use at global and regional levels

Last update

2010

Coverage

Global

Availability

Not freely available

Partners

Issg logo

IUCN Invasive Species Specalist Group

Conu logo cmyk

Concordia University

Contact point